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due to severe storms

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO JUNE 17

Find information on the most recent tax relief provisions for taxpayers affected by disaster situations.

storm behind house

Updated as of: March 4, 2024

The Internal Revenue Service announced tax relief for individuals and businesses in certain states affected by severe storms, tornadoes and other natural disasters. These taxpayers now have until June 17, 2024, to file various federal individual and business tax returns and make tax payments. The June 17, 2024, deadline applies to individual income tax returns and payments normally due on April 15, 2024.

What states and counties have been impacted?

California

Individuals and households that reside or have a business in San Diego County qualify for tax relief. The declaration permits the IRS to postpone certain tax-filing and tax-payment deadlines for taxpayers who reside or have a business in the disaster area. 

Connecticut

Individuals and households that reside or have a business in New London County, and the Tribal Nations of Mohegan and Mashantucket Pequot qualify for tax relief. The declaration permits the IRS to postpone certain tax-filing and tax-payment deadlines for taxpayers who reside or have a business in the disaster area.

Maine

Individuals and households that reside or have a business in Androscoggin, Franklin, Hancock, Kennebec, Oxford, Penobscot, Piscataquis, Somerset, Waldo, and Washington counties, qualify for tax relief. 

Michigan

Individuals and households that reside or have a business in Eaton, Ingham, Ionia, Kent, Livingston, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, and Wayne counties, qualify for tax relief. The declaration permits the IRS to postpone certain tax-filing and tax-payment deadlines for taxpayers who reside or have a business in the disaster area.

Rhode Island

Individuals and households that reside or have a business in Providence County, qualify for tax relief. The declaration permits the IRS to postpone certain tax-filing and tax-payment deadlines for taxpayers who reside or have a business in the disaster area. 

Washington

Individuals and households that reside or have a business in Spokane County qualify for tax relief. The declaration permits the IRS to postpone certain tax-filing and tax-payment deadlines for taxpayers who reside or have a business in the disaster area. 

West Virginia

Individuals and households that reside or have a business in Boone, Calhoun, Clay, Harrison, Kanawha, and Roane counties, qualify for tax relief. The declaration permits the IRS to postpone certain tax-filing and tax-payment deadlines for taxpayers who reside or have a business in the disaster area.

Who are the affected taxpayers?

Taxpayers considered to be affected taxpayers eligible for the postponement of time to file returns, pay taxes and perform other time-sensitive acts are those taxpayers listed in Treas. Reg. § 301.7508A-1(d)(1), and include individuals who live, and businesses (including tax-exempt organizations) whose principal place of business is located, in the covered disaster area. Taxpayers not in the covered disaster area, but whose records necessary to meet a deadline listed in Treas. Reg. § 301.7508A-1(c) are in the covered disaster area, are also entitled to relief. In addition, all relief workers affiliated with a recognized government or philanthropic organization assisting in the relief activities in the covered disaster area and any individual visiting the covered disaster area who was killed or injured as a result of the disaster are entitled to relief.

Under section 7508A, the IRS gives affected taxpayers until June 17, 2024, to file most tax returns (including individual, corporate, and estate and trust income tax returns; partnership returns, S corporation returns, and trust returns; estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer tax returns; annual information returns of tax-exempt organizations; and employment and certain excise tax returns), that have either an original or extended due date occurring on or after Aug. 24, 2023, and before June 17, 2024, are granted additional time to file through June 17, 2024

Affected taxpayers that have an estimated income tax payment originally due on or after Aug. 24, 2023, are postponed through June 17, 2024, will not be subject to penalties for failure to pay estimated tax installments as long as such payments are paid on or before June 17, 2024.

The IRS also gives affected taxpayers until June 17, 2024, to perform other time-sensitive actions described in Treas. Reg. § 301.7508A-1(c)(1) and Rev. Proc. 2018-58, 2018-50 IRB 990 (December 10, 2018), that are due to be performed on or after Aug. 24, 2023, and before June 17, 2024, are granted additional time to file through June 17, 2024.

This relief also includes the filing of Form 5500 series returns that were required to be filed on or after Aug. 24, 2023, and before June 17, 2024, are postponed through June 17, 2024, in the manner described in section 8 of Rev. Proc. 2018-58. The relief described in section 17 of Rev. Proc. 2018-58, pertaining to like-kind exchanges of property, also applies to certain taxpayers who are not otherwise affected taxpayers and may include acts required to be performed before or after the period above.

Unless an act is specifically listed in Rev. Proc. 2018-58, the postponement of time to file and pay does not apply to information returns in the W-2, 1094, 1095, 1097, 1098 or 1099 series; to Forms 1042-S, 3921, 3922 or 8027; or to employment and excise tax deposits. However, penalties on deposits due on or after Aug. 24, 2023, and before Sept. 8, 2023, will be abated as long as the tax deposits were made by Sept. 8, 2023.

GET HELP WITH DISASTER RELIEF

We can help determine if you qualify for the extended deadline June 17, 2024.

Additional relief opportunities

Additional relief may be available to affected taxpayers who participate in a retirement plan or individual retirement arrangement (IRA). For example, a taxpayer may be eligible to take a special disaster distribution that would not be subject to the additional 10% early distribution tax and allows the taxpayer to spread the income over three years. Taxpayers may also be eligible to make a hardship withdrawal. Each plan or IRA has specific rules and guidance for their participants to follow.

The IRS may provide additional disaster relief in the future.

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